Idaho College Students All Likely Killed With ‘Rambo’ Style Knife

Ka-Bar Knife

According to reports, authorities are searching for a “Rambo”-style knife in connection with the grisly killings of four University of Idaho students.

In an interview with the Idaho Statesman on Wednesday, Moscow Building Supply general manager Scott Jutte said that police had visited the store numerous times asking if any Ka-Bar knives had been sold.

In an interview with the local paper, Jutte said “they specifically asked whether we carried Ka-Bar-style knives.”

“If we did, we could’ve reviewed surveillance footage. But it wasn’t something I could help them with,” explained the manager.

He said a police officer had visited the home improvement store on Monday.

According to police, Ethan Chapin, Madison Mogen, Xana Kernodle, and Kaylee Goncalves were stabbed to death early Sunday morning with an “edged weapon.”

The victims were found after police responded to a 911 call reporting an unconscious person at the King Road home where they lived with two female roommates. Authorities have not named any suspects or persons of interest.

It is likely that the same knife was used for the killings of all four students, according to Coroner Cathy Mabbutt. An autopsy report will be released next week.

Anthony Dahlinger, capt. of the Moscow Police, declined to comment on the interview with Jutte or the search for the murder weapon.

In the 1940s, the U.S. Marine Corps issued the combat knife to members of the branch and it is similar to Rambo’s knife, Jutte said.

Eventually, the knife was adopted by the Marines, the Army, the Navy, the Coast Guard, and the Underwater Demolition Teams.

Ka-Bar says survivalists and outdoor enthusiasts use the knives extensively.

Based on the evidence at the scene, Moscow Police Chief James Fry said investigators are pursuing every lead.

Residents should remain vigilant since the “individual is still out there.”

John Nightbridge is a veteran reporter, researcher, and economic policy major from UCLA. Passionate about world issues and potential ways to solve them is a significant focus of his work. Writing freelance and reading the news are John's passions at work. Outside of work, it's all about sky diving, surfing, and stock market modeling.